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    The purpose of this survey was to learn more about the indications, criteria, and methods surgeons use for performing examination under anesthesia (EUA) for "intermediate" sized posterior wall acetabular fractures (those involving 20% to 40% of the posterior wall) and to find what criteria are used to determine hip instability. An 18 question survey was posted on the Ortho- paedic Trauma Association's website and was used to gather anonymous data from orthopaedic surgeons regarding their approach to the intermediate sized posterior wall fracture. Considerable variability existed among re- sponses to many of the questions asked. Based on the an - swers given to the survey, a consensus of 75% or more of respondents was found for the following: 1. Supine position for the examination (100%); 2. "Live" fluoroscopy is used during the examination (97%); 3. The AP and obturator oblique are the x-rays most frequently used (81% and 76%, respectively); 4. The hip is placed in flexion and adduction during the exam (100% and 84%, respectively); 5. Axial load is applied during the examination (90%); Finally, 6. instabil - ity is defined as subluxation on exam by most respondents (98%), and any perceived visible subluxation is what defines instability (88%). Most surgeons agreed with the following: 1. Supine is the position of choice for the examination; 2. "Live" fluoroscopy is used during the examination; 3. The AP and obturator oblique are the x-rays most frequently used; 4. The hip is placed in flexion and adduction during the exam; 5. Axial load is applied during the examination; and 6. Instability is defined as subluxation on exam.

    Citation

    John Riehl, Kenneth Koval, Joshua Langford, Mark Munro, George Haidukewych. Examination Under Anesthesia for Posterior Wall Acetabular Fracture A Survey of the OTA Membership. Bulletin of the Hospital for Joint Disease (2013). 2016 Jun;74(2):124-9


    PMID: 27281316

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